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Mindfulness Exercises

As we finish up our series on reinventing our relationship to stress, I wanted to be sure that one of the most important aspects to building stress-resiliency isn’t forgotten about: Rest and Recovery. Despite all kinds of messaging from productivity podcasts, books on achievement and motivational “experts” telling you that constant hustling is the only...
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When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves. Viktor Frankl

According to Dr. Kelly McGonigal: stress is most likely to be harmful when the following conditions are present: it feels against your will, out of your control and utterly devoid of meaning. If you can change any of these conditions – by finding some meaning in it – you can reduce the harmful effects of...
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The goal is not to bundle ourselves in bubble wrap to avoid all stress, but rather to change the way we think about stress.

In our everyday lexicon, stress has become the negative blanket term for things both traumatic and slightly annoying in our lives. We’ve stopped searching for more specific language to describe what’s truly happening in the moment. Instead, we label everything from divorce to a printer jam as “stressful”. We don’t get to choose whether our...
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mindful

There’s no point in sugarcoating this topic. There’s currently a lot of negative, fearful, angry and defensive information being thrown at us on a minute by minute basis. Taking care of our own well-being and sanity must become a priority in a time like this. Now more than ever, we need to take precautions, in...
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It’s that time of year again … after some of us indulged our way through the holidays, it’s time to step away from the can of frosting and chart our course for a healthier 2017. But there’s an annual disconnect between our good intentions for the year ahead and the choices we make once the...
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Latest MindfulLifeToday.com blog: How to re-wire your brain for stress resiliency.One of our biggest contributors to stress isn’t the actual situation that is occurring. It’s our INTERPRETATION of events that causes a lot of our daily suffering.

Does your brain have an interpreter? One of our biggest contributors to stress isn’t the actual situation that is occurring.  It’s our INTERPRETATION of events that causes a lot of our daily suffering. Neuropsychologist, Rick Hanson, calls this, the second dart. The first darts of life are the inevitable annoyances that happen throughout our day...
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